Question of the Week: When was Jesus made Perfect?

Question of the Week: When was Jesus made Perfect?

On September 17th, 2018, Brian Goad sent the Mentionables this question:

In Hebrews 5:7-8, it talks about Christ working through the trauma of what was about to happen on the cross with tears and loud crying and prayers, and that through this suffering it led him learning obedience. Then in verse 9, it mentions "having been made perfect" he became the source of eternal life. 

Does this mean that through his final testing to align his will with the Father ("not my will, but your will" he prayed in the garden) and his resolution of obedience to suffer and die on the cross, at that point he became perfect? If not, when did he became perfect (as the wording seems to indicate that he was made perfect at some point). 

Also, I'd like some info on any heresies that might be related to this question, as I'm concerned that this is towing a fine line in the question of impeccability and Jesus' Divine vs human nature.

These are the answers from the team.

Putting them on the Defensive

Putting them on the Defensive

I’d like to suggest a technique I’ve been trying that seems to have amazing results. Too often, we have taken upon ourselves the assumption of modernity. This modern view cuts off the beliefs of the ancients and says that we must answer the knowledge (Though I’d say it’s what is falsely called knowledge) of today and if we believe God exists or morality is objective or miracles can happen, we’d better give a strong reason why.

Five Proofs that the Old Testament is not Mythology

Five Proofs that the Old Testament is not Mythology

hile far from universally accepted, even the most strident critic must admit that the Christian New Testament has a great deal of historical relevance. It is correlated in numerous areas by contemporary first century writings and archeology such that even those who regard it as basically a religious text will still lean on it as a historic reference in some areas. 

Not so with the Old Testament. A large portion of the contemporary world - academic and non - considers the Christian Old Testament/Hebrew Tanakh to be purely a work of fiction, borrowing heavily from Egyptian and Babylonian myths. 

Abraham Sacrificing Isaac: Not What You Think

Abraham Sacrificing Isaac: Not What You Think

By my lights, there is no greater challenge to the threat of Biblical inerrancy than the apparent barbarity of God as portrayed in the Old Testament. One apparent textbook example of this is the famous Bible story in which God orders Abraham to sacrifice his beloved son Isaac in Genesis 22. How could God tell a righteous man to murder his own innocent son? The common perception of the story is that Abraham, convinced by God that he was going to lose his son, prepared the sacrifice. The problem with this perception is that it’s false. Abraham knew he wouldn’t be giving up his son, and so the story of Abraham sacrificing his son isn’t quite as bad as it looks. 

When God’s Drawing is Not So Gentle

When God’s Drawing is Not So Gentle

Years ago a popular song by Christian artist Jeremy Riddle captured how many of us view (and indeed experience) our walk with The Lord. It said of God, “You draw me gently to my knees. And I am lost for words, so lost in love. I’m sweetly broken, wholly surrendered.”

Seeking The One True God

Seeking The One True God

Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus is a tremendously “bingable” book. My wife could easily sit down and read it in one long sitting. However, I have a much more ADHD approach in my reading and lucky for me this edition was written in a way that allowed me to read while following multiple rabbit trails on various topics before easily getting back on track with Nabeel’s story. The great thing about the chapters in this book is they all provide extra resources, many of which are contained in the back of the book. These resources allowed me to follow some of my sidetracked thoughts and greatly increased the overall “experience” of this read. The expert contributions are brief yet to the point and have helped shape this book into a resource for anyone interested in comparing Islam and Christianity.