Question of the Week: Can Eternity have a Beginning?

Question of the Week: Can Eternity have a Beginning?

On February 1, 2019, the Mentionables received this question from Seth F.:

The arguments is used for God's creation that creation had a beginning therefore it cannot be eternal. Scientists believe in the big bag so they believe the universe started, and Christians believe the universe started.  Because eternality is two directions past and future. How is it then that we humans each have a beginning of life, but also are going to live with God in eternity? If we are eternal beings them how did we have a beginning? Or are we not eternal beings?

Here are the responses from the Mentionables.

Question of the Week: What Keeps the Mentionables Going

Question of the Week: What Keeps the Mentionables Going

On December 17th, the Mentionables recieved the following question from JD:

The majority of The Mentionables have been in Online Apologetics for a few years now. You have seen/read/responded to hundreds if not thousands of memes, posts, trolls, etc. in your time as an OA (Online Apologist). What motivates you to keep going? You continually have to answer the same question worded in different ways and in different memes and receive the basic response each time (e.g. Responses to Questions no Christian can answer). 


Have you thought about 'retiring' to a home online where the trolls and memes don't play? What would it take for you to retire?


Thanks!


JD

Here are the answers from the team

Background Christianity

Background Christianity

When my wife and I first moved to Tennessee, there was a time she could hear the trains coming by as we lived probably less than a mile from the train tracks. I had got used to it. It took her a little while.

In the same way, when you grow up in a culture that has these kinds of moral beliefs, it’s natural to just assume that everyone knows that. They don’t.

Reset What?

Reset What?

This is a book review of the latest Answers in Genesis (AiG) Book; “Gospel Reset”. Now, with that in mind I have been extremely critical of AiG in a past article. However, I wanted to reject my presuppositions and come at this from a fresh take. I have engaged numerous people as of late who have unequivocally supported AiG as a Godly organization. This support has opened me up to giving AiG and more specifically Ken Ham a second chance. I truly did the best I could to free my mind from expectations and look for the best AiG had to offer, especially since this was sent to thousands of churches around the country. Even so, my expectations were a book that I might disagree with but could respect for its support of a literal Genesis and a presuppositional apologetics approach. Were my minimal expectations met? Read on to see and judge for yourself.

Atheism and Intuitive Morality

Atheism and Intuitive Morality

Studies that show that religion is just the result of intuitive thinking  have become a very tempting carrot to more outspoken skeptics - the ones who compare religion with so much vapid self-delusion. The unspoken (and frequently spoken) conclusion being that "if you just thought about it, you'd never believe it." 

There is, however, one area in which the roles are oddly reversed: morality. 

The religious have a very rational grounding for their belief in morality: If the universe has a Designer, then morality is a function of design. Free-will, choice, justice, and intelligibility all flow from this concept of designer and design. Atheists, on the other hand, tend to use intuition as the basis for morality.

Question of the Week: Solipsism?

Question of the Week: Solipsism?

On October 3rd, the Mentionables received this question from Rachel Harper:

I found this group through Theology Gals where Tyler did an episode on presuppositional apologetics.
I have been having doubts related to the philosophical idea of solipsism and was wondering if you guys could please help me see what are the errors with this view and how do I get around it?
Thank you!
~Rachel

For the sake of the reader, Solipsism is the idea that one can only be certain that their own mind exists - and that anything outside of one’s own mind may be real, or may be an illusion of the mind.

Here are the answers from the team: